Megan (sutkarak) wrote in radiantish,
Megan
sutkarak
radiantish

Duplicate the effects of Linear Light!

linear light;____
Photoshop has a very popular blend mode called "Linear Light". The users of Paint Shop Pro cannot use this blend because it is not available. After hours of experimenting in Paint Shop Pro, I have found the perfect combination (for every image I've used) to duplicate Linear Light in Paint Shop Pro!

information about this tutorial;____
Written: October 5, 2006
Author: Megan
Program: Paint Shop Pro 9
Can this be translated?: I don't know about Gimp, but you honestly don't want to translate it to Photoshop. You already have linear light.

the tutorial;____
Find an image that you want to use. You could be making a banner, or an icon or something. I used this:
Name: Icon 01 (Base)


I am going to make that base look like this icon:
Name: Icon 02


In order to get Icon 02 in Photoshop, duplicate the base twice and set them both to Linear Light.

Of course, I don't have Photoshop, so I use Paint Shop Pro 9 for everything. Linear light is not an option for it. It's just as easy though; you just have to combine two different blend modes!

First: Duplicate the base (Icon 01) twice (exactly like the Photoshop version). You should have a total of three layers (one background, two raster or three raster layers). Here is how it should look if you are confused:


Second: Set the top layer (the second copy of the base) to Dodge - Opacity 82. Your icon will be a lot brighter looking now. Don't pay attention to it right now if you don't like it. You top layer must be set this way!


Third: Set the middle layer (the first copied layer) to Multiply - Opacity 100. Since the image was so defined, that's all you need, and now you have your own linear light!


This is what my layer palette looks like:


Everytime you want to make an icon look like Photoshop's linear light, you need both of those layers. Since this icon used two linear light layers, duplicate BOTH your layers and drag them both to the top, making the dodge layer the top one, of course (keep the dodge layer's opacity 82). Dodge greatly brightens and contrasts the picture while multiply will darken it. Here is an example of my layer palette:


Sometimes, you will have an ugly looking icon if you try this. Since you don't have the actual Linear Light feature, you're improvising so sometimes, it won't look up to par. If this happens, mess around with the opacity of the Dodge layer.

Let's try it with an icon unlike the first. Let's use this base:
Icon 03

This is what I'm going to try to make:
Icon 04

In order to make that on Photoshop out of the base, duplicate the base and set it to Linear Light. That's one duplicated base this time, not two, so we won't be able to acheive the same effect without modifying the Opacity.

First: Once again, duplicate the base twice (exactly like the Photoshop version). You should have a total of three layers (one background, two raster or three raster layers). Here is how it should look if you are confused:


Second: Set the top layer (the second copy of the base) to Dodge - Opacity 100. Your icon will be a lot brighter looking now. Don't pay attention to it right now if you don't like it. You top layer must be set this way!
Third: Set the middle layer (the first copied layer) to Multiply - Opacity 100.

That's way too bright for me, and it doesn't match up with Icon 04 so I am going to mess around the the opacity to make it look nicer. I put it on 50. I don't like it so I put it up at 75. It looks nice that way, but that's not what I'm trying to get! I finally decide on an opacity of 82, and I have something that, even though it's not exact, it's pretty darn similar!


I'm going to try this one more time using this base:


Set on one layer of linear light, this is what you get


Follow the same procedure and you get the same thing using the same steps.


Review:
I think a safe bet would be using a Dodge Layer set at 82 Opacity (You can change it to whatever you want if you don't like it that bright) and a Multiply Layer set at 100 Opacity. Remember, 1 linear light layer = 1 set of dodge and multiply (2 layers). 2 linear light layers = 2 sets of dodge and multiply (4 layers).

In the end, this is a tutorial simply mocking what linear light does. It does not recreate it exactly, especially when you don't know what linear light would appear like on an icon. Change the dodge opacity to your liking, depending on how much contrast you like.

credits;____
I would like to give a special thanks to any of the icon makers who helped me with this tutorial, especially Pichu's Paradise because she provided the first two icons and was the true inspiration of this tutorial and x-angelwings-x for providing the last icon! Both were used with permission. Any feedback and/or other information would be helpful for when I rewrite this!
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